What do you see when you look around?

He sat on top of the world, dangling his legs over the edge, and surveyed the green lands far below that stretched to the horizon.  Though he felt no fear with his feet hung thousands of feet above the precipice, his pulse quickened all the same because his mind raced with the future possibilities the land represented.  He could lumber it.  He could till it.  He could graze it.  The healthy hue meant water and fertile soil and, with some willing hard work, a good life in the sun.  He laughed with delight, stretching his hands to the warming sun, while letting the air swirl around his kicking legs.

…..

He sat on top of a boulder, dangling his legs over the edge, and looked across the grass that stretched to the edge of the park.  Though he felt no fear with his feet mere inches above the ground, his pulse quickened all the same because his mind raced with the possibilities the park represented.  He could run it.  He could swing it.  He could slide it.  The lush hue meant healthy patches and soft soil and, with a spark of imagination, a good time in the sun.  He laughed with delight, stretching his hands to the warming sun, while letting the air swirl around his kicking legs.

…..

He stood next to a cornerstone, his tired legs bent at the knees, and looked across his property that stretched further than he could see.  Though he felt no fear with his feet solidly on the ground, his pulse quickened all the same with the memory of a good life given to the land.  He had worked it.  He had cared for it.  He had bled and sweat and cried into it.  The homestead was well run and self-sustaining, with a few key contributions here and there, and had grown beyond his control.  He laughed with delight, stretching his hands to the warming sun, while letting the air swirl around his aching legs.

very interesting…

While busily catching up on all the posts I’ve missed since I fell into this year’s NaNoWriMo, I happened upon CK’s post regarding the “I Write Like” writing analyzer/web tool.  The page lets you insert examples of your writing and then spits out the famous author it deems your work to resemble the most.

I was intrigued.

So, I scrolled through the kingdom and pulled out several different kinds of posts to review, entered them into the tool, clicked on the analyze button, and here are the results:

A segment from this year’s NaNoWriMo project was written like: Ursula K. Le Guin

A random chatty post with updates from the kingdom was written like: Lewis Carroll

A chapter from my weekly western serial was written like: Robert Louis Stevenson

One of my silly flash fiction posts was written like: P. G. Wodehouse

My freshly pressed picture writing prompt post was written like: Isaac Asimov

One of my love poems to the Queen was written like: Margaret Atwood

The final chapter of my 2012 NaNo project was written like: Jack London

The YeahWrite post about the death of my grandfather was written like: Stephen King

My “Selcouth” Prompts for the Promptless post was written like: Stephen King

One of my favorite poems that was written like: James Joyce

One of my posts where I describe the sunrise was written like: Stephen King

……

Interesting, interesting, interesting.

Should I be worried that my writing style is all over the place and I “sound” different depending on the type of post I’m doing?  Or, should I be impressed that I’m able to change that voice depending on the message I’m trying to convey?

What do you think?  Is it good or bad that my results were so varied?

Then again, who cares!!!!

The tool said I write like Stephen King three different times.  I’m.  In.  Heaven.

be true to who you are

If I had one piece of advice for someone who is bravely entering the blogosphere now, it would be to embrace their individuality, to be true to who they are.

That seems pretty straight forward, right?

It isn’t always that simple.

Once you’ve gotten that first like, or that first positive comment, or that first follow.  something can switch inside you and make you crave more.  You can lose yourself, lose your purpose for starting the blog in the first place, while you go in search of stats.  And then what does that accomplish?  You’ve got a ton of followers, but your blog is no longer the outlet you wanted/needed it to be.

Because we are all unique, because we are all individuals, there is no need for you to go in search of an “online persona.”  There is no need to create some new identity.  Be yourself.  You are who you are, and your voice will ring true in what you post: pictures, fiction, daily prompt responses, journal entries, top ten lists, news articles, etc…

If you stay true, the whole experience will be more rewarding, and the stats will follow eventually anyway.  The blogosphere is enormous.  Trust me, there are an abundance of bloggers out there who want to hear your story in your own words.

……

Then again, I’ve been blogging for less than a year, so what do I know…

For those who have been around longer, am I on the right track?