kids say the darndest things

He sat alone on the hill as twilight settled around him.  The new moon would not be making an appearance and that allowed the stars to shine even more fiercely than normal.  A chilling breeze tugged playfully with the sleeves of his sweater but he paid it no mind.  He wasn’t there to play.  He was on a mission.

Tilting his head ever so slightly, he waited patiently and it seemed like the night hushed to make his task a bit easier.

“What are you doing up there?”  His mom’s voice carried clearly in the darkness.  He heard her, but was too intent upon his objective that he didn’t actually realize she was talking to him.

Only slightly irritated, her son was often lost in his own world and own thoughts, she marched up the hill to investigate.  She gently laid a hand on his shoulder and he startled back to reality, “What are you doing, honey?  It’s time to come in.”

“But, mom, I’m listening to the sounds of the stars,” he pouted, shaking himself free from her and returning his previous stance.

“Oh, honey, you can’t hear the stars,” she tried to break the news as softly as she could, she didn’t want to crush his spirit, and she reached out for him again.

He didn’t flinch when she placed her hand on his shoulder and squeezed comfortingly.  He didn’t stop what he was doing either.  He knew he could hear the stars perfectly clear, and they had already told him that his mom wouldn’t be able to hear them.  It was supposed to be their little secret, and while he felt a little guilty for almost giving it away, he was relieved that she hadn’t believed him.

He smiled giddily, as only a child can, as they forgave him for the slip and told him it was all going to be okay.  His mom started talking again and pulling, tugging, urging him down the hill back into the house but he ignored her as the stars relayed the last of their nightly message.  He was supposed to sit tight for another night, but soon, very soon, they would be coming and he needed to be ready.

“Okay, mom, we can go in now.  They’re done.”

She looked at her son, and then leaned back to gaze into the winking heavens, only to look back down and shake her head.  His imagination never ceased to amaze her.

…..

The next night when the aliens came to enslave the world, she wished desperately she had asked more questions, had believe his outlandish tales, had done something, anything, to prepare, to warn others.  But, it was all too late.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

I bet you guessed it.  I bet you already know.  And you would be right!  This was another post for the Inspiration Monday Writing Challenge:

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The Rules

There are none. Read the prompts, get inspired, write something. No word count minimum or maximum. You don’t have to include the exact prompt in your piece, and you can interpret the prompt(s) any way you like.

OR

No really; I need rules!

Okay; write 200-500 words on the prompt of your choice. You may either use the prompt as the title of your piece or work it into the body of your piece. You must complete it before 6 pm CST on the Monday following this post.

The Prompts:

SELL TIME
MOMENT IN THE SUN
SOUNDS OF THE STARS
HOW TO BE AN EARTHLING
OFF THE RECORD

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44 thoughts on “kids say the darndest things

  1. I could just see the boy’s mother trying to warn the police of this dastardly alien plot the stars were telling her son. There would be comforting grasps of the shoulder as they slipped her into a nice, new straightjacket….

  2. Wow, didn’t see that ending coming. Reminded me of that Nic Cage movie Knowing. You know, the one where Nic Cage plays… Nic Cage. It had a vibe like this too, and I didn’t know what was going on… that movie went to a very strange, and pretty memorable, place.

    You got the knack Matticus. If I may call you that.

    • Yes, you may call me Matticus. 😛

      I remember liking that movie too. The ending was pretty good. Thanks for the compliment.

      Isn’t it amazing how many movies Nic Cage can play himself in and still pull it off? Is that good acting? Good writing? Or good directing?

      • Nah man, it’s Nic Cage. It’s all Cage all the time. Have you seen Bad Lieutenant? It’s a tour de force of Nic Cage at his best… or worst. I can’t tell. Okay, I’m just ripping off Community now.

      • No, I haven’t seen Bad Lieutenant, but now I can’t tell if I am supposed to watch it or not. Are we priasing him or dissing him? Or both? And do people still say “dissing?” Is that a thing?

      • “dissing” is still cool. At least in Canada. On Community, they recenty riffed on Mr. Cage, asking if he is a good actor or a bad actor, the thesis being that it is impossible to say one way or the other.

        Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans is the best movie with the worst title I have ever seen. Well worth it, as long as weird doesn’t generally turn you off.

      • Weird turn me off? Have you seen the silliness that runs rampant in the Kingdom? Do you see the list of people I have followed recently? Weird is, apparently, my thing.

      • Hah! Fair enough. Hmm, well… I’m not sure how I can help with the story. I know it wasn’t my best… I couldn’t get the words to come up to convey the picture I had in my head, which was sad, because I thought the premise was fun: cute kid on a hill chattnig with the stars… and then a last minute twist.

    • Thank you! When I started writing I was going to keep it “endearlingly amusing,” but then as I thought more about what sounds the stars would actually be making I got a vision of a cross between the baby monitors in “Signs” and the digital instructions from “Contact.” The descent into darkness was a result of that image.

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